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Old 07-08-2012, 06:33 PM   #1
nate1982
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Question Backpacking Tips

Looking for some input on freeze dried fod, I will be packing solo for a seven day high country mule deer hunt and was wonderign what the best option was for food. I plan on using my jet boil and get freez dried food, does anyone have any opinions on what company offers the best kits or should i just buy meals from the packet?

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Old 07-08-2012, 06:40 PM   #2
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Mountain House is good stuff.I love it much.
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Old 07-08-2012, 06:53 PM   #3
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

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Mountain House is good stuff.I love it much.

Yep. It's yummy. And lots of salt, carbs, etc. Costco had them not long ago in jumbo boxes.
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Old 07-08-2012, 06:54 PM   #4
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Another for mountain house. I havent had anything from them that wasn't good.


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Old 07-08-2012, 06:57 PM   #5
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

get the vacuum sealed mtn house if your packing it. Same everything except half the size!
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Old 07-08-2012, 07:00 PM   #6
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Backpacker's Pantry and Mountain House are my favorite. If you'd eat the normal version of the food listed on the label, then you're probably good to go with the freeze dried version. Might not seem like a lot of food, but it usually is, per serving.
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Old 07-08-2012, 07:40 PM   #7
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

My wife and I hiked the grand canyon and used mountain house and LOVED it. She said to check Costco they had it last week.
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Old 07-08-2012, 07:59 PM   #8
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+1 for mountain house. A box at Costco is 10 dinners for I think $40. Seemed like a steal to me.
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Old 07-08-2012, 08:04 PM   #9
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Talking Re: Backpacking Tips

Get some packgoats and eat steak and beer.
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Old 07-08-2012, 09:58 PM   #10
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

If you happen to know someone at Oregon Freeze Dry, you can get Mt. House half priced.
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Old 07-09-2012, 12:13 AM   #11
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Of the brands, Mountain House ranks high. Some people's GI tracts cannot tolerate daily intake, and it can go both ways. I would begin tasting and observing affects on yourself before going all-in on a pack trip. I personally can eat one every other day without unwanted affects or tiring of the palatability. I like to mix it up. . . . probably more than most?

A traditional caloric target is 7,000 per day on a strenuous hunt. Because weight and space is a premium many will shoot for 100 calories per ounce, give or take. Calories/energy is important as is protein for muscles. Here are some ideas that I like to use so that freeze-dried is only a portion of my diet on a backcountry expedition.

Mountain House every other day
Freeze-dried eggs
Freeze-dried Parmesan cheese
Instant oatmeal with the sugar (not reduced sugar, I want the calories/energy)
Ramen noodles (some like couscous, I just do not care much for it)
Jerky or other dried meats
Nuts, especially cashews
Protein bars
Candy bars (a treat with coffee in the evening)
Hard candy (pick-me-up and salivates the mouth)
Small block cheese and crackers (luxury item for me, goes with jerky as meal)
Bagels/peanut butter
Tortillas (goes with Mountain House fillers, or eggs, or meat from fresh kill etc)
Seasoning packets for preparing fresh meat if "lucky" (powdered teriyaki etc)
Instant pudding (a treat with high calorie for weight)
Dried milk
Powdered electrolyte drinks
COFFEE (I find Starbucks Via hard to beat. One in AM and one in PM. I love
coffee, but want to avoid dehydration.)

This is by no means comprehensive but gives you ideas for backpacking food. Remember that space is at a premium also so be mindful of how you pack . . . not simply the weight of what you pack.

Good luck! I would enjoy seeing you post a high country mule deer pack trip.
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Old 07-09-2012, 01:31 AM   #12
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

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Originally Posted by millsymojo View Post
Seasoning packets for preparing fresh meat if "lucky" (powdered teriyaki etc)

I usually bring some seasoning salt for this purpose. Can you expand (brand, where to buy) on powdered teriyaki?



I would add Packit Gourmet to the list. I haven't actually eaten them yet, but I have some sitting in my pile for this fall and I have read a lot of great reviews online. Prices are comparable or a bit more expensive than Mtn. House, but the meals appear to be a little more 'gourmet'.
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:03 AM   #13
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Millsymojo gave a pretty good list. Some Mt. House's are better than others. We also pack the dry marinade packets for spicing up any meet. We also pack Idahoan's. They taste great, easy to cook, and are very packable. They come in four or five different flavors and they are all good.
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Old 07-09-2012, 03:35 PM   #14
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

mountain house chicken breast meat with instant potato. my coworker was eating a chicken salad from Wendy's on lunch one day and i busted my MH meal out . He tried the chicken and sad "dam that's better then this chicken " I don't care for a lot of the meals but this one is great . also the desert ones and breakfast all seam very good . these with some trail mix, granola bars and dehydrated pineapple and you got yourself everything you need . don't forget powdered milk is not very tasty but it can help with granola for breakfast .
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:42 PM   #15
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

me and my hunting buddy are backpacking in as well and I have a jet boil that we will b using. nothing but mountain house for us. they are delicious. its like eating a home cooked meal out in the middle of nowhere. it keeps the moral high. we were getn my trail cam yesterday and i asked him if he still had some leftover from last year and he said he took them for lunch that they were that good. oh and the dollar tree has cliff bars and other energy bars just so ya know.
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:44 PM   #16
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

They have come along way with the instant potatoes....that would be a must for an addition to most meals....

Sounds like a blast and I hope you have a decent cam and take a lot of pics...especially of the buck you harvest!!
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:46 PM   #17
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Don't forget the bagels, I have done quite a few 5 night trips and always take a few fresh bagels, they are dang near bullet proof and nothing is better the a Mountain House breakfast or dinner with a chewy bagel.
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Old 07-09-2012, 06:08 PM   #18
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

I prefer the Backpacker's pantry breakfasts such as granola and the Backpacker Pantry cheesecake. Other than that, the Mountain House is a good choice.

We will often attempt to get some packaged precooked rice and beans or lentil mix. If you can catch a fish, and take a tortilla, you are in good shape for a break from the freeze dried routine.

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Old 07-09-2012, 07:13 PM   #19
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Mountain House is good, but have you ever thought of cutting some gear weight? What about going stoveless with food that doesn't require cooking? No cook/prep time, no fuel issues, no equipment malfunction issues, no clean up.
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Old 07-09-2012, 07:59 PM   #20
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

First try it before you take it n the field and decide you do not like it.
Second: Assuming you are backpacking - if this car camping - then minimize freeze dried food. Figure in weight and volume vs nutritional needs ( Calories, electrolytes)..Do you need 2600 or 3000 or 3600 cal per day. Make a list
Third: When do you eat
Fourth understand when you need to be eating carbs vs some other mixture.

A lot of breakfasts with eggs are questionable ( Maybe I still have my tastebuds). I use oatmeal or something like coucous. Tried a lot of different egg meals - just not my style.

Have used Mountain House, HawksVittles . Just made my own. Hawks Vittles ha some different items - not sure if they have muti year lifetimes. Think it is fresher tastin.

A web site like Trail cooking and Freezer bag cooking are good references

I use to take in a frozen steak fro first or second night – if weather permits. Alternatively - make up some comfort foods and reheat in the field- particularly if you can keep cool.

Forget Powdered electrolyte mixtures - most have too much sugar and weigh too much. Might check out Nuun - small package makes 12 – 16 ounce drinks or use your diet to help compensate fro electrolytes

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
The following are some examples – and comments - more related to winter camping.

Types of foods:
High fat foods are more preferable for winter time meals.
The freeze dried meals (like Mountain House) tend not to offer this crucial element.
Important for staying warm in cold weather

In the winter you will want to up your calories intake and increase you fat ratio.



Breakfast Backpacking Foods
Instant oatmeal + Dired milk + berries = Gu or Honey
Granola (with dried milk)

Breakfast
7 couscous porridge.................4lbs 8oz
½ pt. loose green tea & 2 strainers.................5oz


Couscous Porridge (adapted from Lipsmackin’ Backpackin’)
Place in a ziplock bag:
½ cup plus 2 Tbs. couscous
½ cup powdered milk
¼ cup brown sugar
1/3 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup dried cherries
1 tsp. cinnamon
¼ tsp salt


Oatmeal w/mixture of shredded coconut, dried currants, and chopped pecans + Goji berry green drink powder mix

Breakfast (per person per day)

2 ounces
Instant oatmeal - single serving envelope
1 ounce
Add 1 tablespoon of protein powder, and 1 tablespoon combination of raisins, dried fruit, and/or sunflower seeds
2 ounces
Balance Bar—this nutritional bar balances protein, carbs and fat in the good ratios
2 ounces
Hot drink - instant coffee, tea, spiced cider
Breakfast subtotal - 7 ounces




Lunch (per person per day)

6 ounces
Bagel with cheese or crackers and peanut butter
3 ounces
2 packages carb gel (Gu, Powergel, etc)
2 ounces
Candy bar


Lunch subtotal - 11 ounces




Lunch Backpacking Foods- Depends how much you want to carry
Bagels, with cream cheese ( Day hike)
PB&J
Power bars
Dried fruit
Salami, Jerky, other preserved meat
GORP (nuts, M&M’s raisins, crackers, dried fruit)
Cheese
Beef or turkey jerky, or other preserved meats
Hot soup


Snacks
Baked Cheesy Puffs
Gorge Delights "Just Fruit" bars
Lara Bars, trail mix, jelly bellies, and beef jerky


Dark Chocolate......................................... ...8 oz
Mixed cashews & almonds.............................14 oz

Dried apricots.......................................... ...11 oz
16 Clif Bars—Maple Nut...............................2lb 8oz


Cheeses,
Beef or turkey jerky, or other preserved meats


XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
When do you need things like carbs
Carbs (~1 hr to digest, 4 cal/gm) and fats (~7 hrs to digest, 9 cal/gm) give fast and slow (respectively) energy.
Protein (~4 hrs to digest, 4cal/gm) is primarily useful for building and repair.
If you are melting snow for water, dried food has less weight advantage than in summer because you will need to use more fuel to produce the water.
Remember if it is cold out you are living in a refrigerator--you can bring perishable food.

ideas to eat:


* Breakfast is a "hot water" meal. The group provides hot water which people put in their own breakfasts. (Oatmeal, museli, etc. Add butter/margarine/oil as desired/tolerated.) Hot drinks, muchies, leftovers from last night's dinner. (Don't toss the dinner leftovers--eat them as part of the next day's breakfast.)

* Lunch starts when breakfast ends (and may be part of breakfast) and ends when dinner begins. Munchies eaten frequently (avoid long stops because you will get cold).

Nuts are a good mixture of carbs, protein, and fats. Carry in your pockets for quick access.

* I generally eat a one-pot glop for dinner. Start with an instant hot soup to keep people warm and hydrated while waiting for dinner.


For the glop, start with instant soup + carbs, then add meat, optional cheese, veggies, fat, and spices.

The final product should be a bit on the soupy side--goes down better if you are a bit dehydrated.
- instant soup: make with enough water to hydrate the carbs
- carbs: instant rice/quick cooking pasta/stove-top stuffing. Lipton-Knorr meals in a packet work well (also contain veggies).
- meat: hamburger, cut up meat, canned meat (removed from the can) eg turkey. Precooked. (~3oz/person) Remember the meat is likely to be frozen, so you want it in the form of small chunks that are not frozen together.
- cheese: a good source of protein, fat, and flavor.
- veggies: frozen or fresh. (May freeze on the trail.)
- fat: add butter, margarine, oil. More when the weather is colder. (Individuals vary widely in how much fat they are willing to eat.)
- spices: to taste. It may be desirable to let individuals add their own spices to allow for varying tastes.
* Drinks: instant soup, instant cider, hot jello, hot chocolate. (Any powdered drink will do.)

Fats consumed at dinner help to keep you warm while (hopefully) sleeping in the wee hours of the morning.

(A piece of candy or small snack can help warm you if you get cold at night. And yes, you can bring it in the tent during the winter--the bears are hibernating.)

And, of course, you need to drink enough water. Drink at all meals, during the day, and bring a water bottle to bed with you at night.

+++++++++++++++++


We bought a vacuum sealer (you can get at most kitchen stores) and make our own meals. These are even better. Shrimp alfredo, lobster bisque, beef stew, chicken cordon-bleau, etc. Here, we make them "all-in-one" without having to mix them up. My trick is to make the meal, then semi-freeze them in a small bowl (when the items are too liquidy the seal doesn't work great). After semi-frozen, seal them up. They will look like big hockey pucks. You don't want them too thick, as they take a long time to thaw in the woods. You are better off making two smaller meals and boil double the water. It's winter...plenty of water (snow) around...just extra fuel. You boil, drink some tea while you are cooking your first meal. Then, while eating your first meal you are boiling your second course. Eat your second course and boil more water for more tea, soup, etc.

You also might want to double-seal your meal just in case one leaks.

+++++++++++++++

I will second the Lipton Noodle packets. Most take 6-9 minutes to cook,they are pretty tasty and cost a buck to feed 2 people.
We supplement that with cheese and pepperoni snacks (fat content) and start with a hot soup like Knorrs Leek soup. One pot-no mess.
+++++++++++++++++

Bigger pot, make some soup. Knori's vegi soup mix, buckwheat noodles, (they cook quick and are big on nutrition) and a packet of chicken. Cayenne & fresh ground black pepper to taste, nothing beats it. Have some cheese, sussage and crackers while you wait for it to heat up. If it's cold enough to freez your cheese & sausage then plan ahead and put them in an inside pocket to defrost or stay warm.


Main meal. Same bigger pot. No need to rinse it. I like the instant pasta stuff you can take right of the shelf, you can use whatever tickles your task buds, just make a lot of it. Add: olive oil, hot spices, cheese and meat. (I'm getting tired of chicken, tuna, salmon so I'm going to start carring some precooked ground beef in a seperate pouch to add whenever I wish) Sprinkle some crushed corn chips over the top, add some more cayenne since your wimpy friends think it's too hot already. Eat until you burst and use guilt to force the leftovers on your friends.

Finish filling hot water bottles for you sleeping bag.

Pee, go to bed, keep your boots near by or wide mouth bottle.


Remember that most likely anything you bring will freeze solid as a rock- so separate your portions into single meal servings. Oh, by the way, cheese can freeze, especially the kind with higher water content, so cube it before hand.

also, power bars are real jaw breakers in the winter. I like those tiny candy bars- you can one inside your mouth where your body heat will soften it up enough to eat.


DINNER
Usually too cold and dark to do any real cooking and frankly I'm usually beat- so I keep it simple
Instant soup. Add some veggies (like peas and corn) and chopped roast
chicken. Yum! Hot tea or that instant apple cidar or hot jello.

Lipton noodle side- add things like tofu or some such (for the vegetarians) frozen veggies, frozen precooked meat. Try the Stroganoff with peas and cubed beef!

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Old 07-09-2012, 08:19 PM   #21
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Lots of good info here. Use it. I love MH,but there are 4 or 5 that are better then the rest. They do get old on an extended stay. Any thing you can add hot water to will work. Mac and cheese is cheaper thru Kraft than MH. Get the idea? And don't freak when your bm's turn orange,its the saoce on the spaeghetti and lausagne,my 2 fav's.lol
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:44 PM   #22
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In my experience I have found Mountain House meals to be better tasting than the others I have tried. I usually look for the meals with at least 2 servings and over 600 total calories. One of my favorites is the Chicken A La King. I've had their bacon and eggs for breakfast. It's ok. Taste is fair but not many calories for the effort.

For breakfast I eat a Back Country Bar. Found them at Winco in the bulk foods section. You can research them online. Pretty dense and calorie packed. Good taste. 10X better than a Cliff Bar.

I snack during the day. Jerky, Almonds, Trail mix, Dried Fruit for variety. Anything that tastes decent and is calorie packed.

At night I have a Mountain House. For whatever reason I always look forward to a warm freeze dried meal.
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:55 PM   #23
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Nate1982.....is this your first stay for this long?? I have done a couple 2 niters(not hunting) and I can imagine for me to jump to a week I would seriously overpack....just because of the lack of experience.....

This thread is great tho cause it really opens my eyes to what I dont need!!

HunterDk1....that is priceless info....lmao....I can imagine a few people have really wondered whats going wrong with the orange poopoo....too funny!!
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:17 PM   #24
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yeah, this will be my first stay for an extended time. Thankyou everyone for all the great info so far, i have been doign research and have foudn out that i am going to need some serious calories for my body type. Once my metabolism kicks into gear which will be day 2 i will be in need of at least 7000 calories per day. I have a very good metabolism and in the high altitude rugged country of the rubies i will need to maximize calories per ounce so that i can survive for 7 days. I spoke with a my moms dietition and nutritionist and she gave me some ideas on what to do.

Its going to be fun and i am learning alot about what i will need to do to accomplish this trip, on a side note we will be camping at lakes for our main spot and all alternatives. Each lake is supposedly a great fishing lake so we will be packing some small poles for afternoon passtimes and pottential meals.
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Old 07-09-2012, 11:09 PM   #25
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by whuppinstick View Post
I usually bring some seasoning salt for this purpose. Can you expand (brand, where to buy) on powdered teriyaki?
The last kind I found was at SW I think?! In the jerky seasoning section?! I know that is not much help, sorry. I do know that Kikkoman makes a marinade packet and a teriyaki powder. I have not tried it but I'd like to. It is just something special to celebrate wild meat in wild places. Sometimes I will take a zippy of Lawry's, garlic salt, and pepper mix also. For you Montana folks I've also had Alpine Touch. . . . big running joke with my Billings bud.
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:20 AM   #26
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

I have found mountain house has too much sodium for me. There are other brands at REI I like better. I don't remember the name off the top of my head. I do like the MH Lasanga, and it is their lowest sodium meal.
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Old 07-10-2012, 01:17 PM   #27
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Just a reminder - if this is your first long trip - take some time to weight and understand the volume that your food menu will be. It is amazing how much weight and volume of your pack it will take up. Add in a good water supply and you will have a better idea of how much weight you will carry - not to mention hunting gear.

Second - many pre-package items can be enopugh for 2 people.

Better yet - do a couple 2 night scouting trips where you take all the food and water you will need for a longer trip - Learn early before waiting to the last minute.
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:07 PM   #28
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

The book "Lip Smack'n Backpacking", available at REI, has some good ideas and recipes for cheap lightweight High Cal, high protein DIY meals for extended trips.

But for the first 2-3 days, I can make Ramen & salted hotdogs work for dinner and power bars, bagals, dried fruit for lunch.
Folgers singles coffee & oatmeal w/ dried apple chunks for breakfast.
Powdered drink mix for hydro bladder.

A fresh grouse, rattle snake, or fish could help as well, so take some montreal spice & S&P.
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:13 PM   #29
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Winco sells Mt. House for a few dollars cheaper than most other stores i've seen.
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:15 PM   #30
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by singleberry152 View Post
Winco sells Mt. House for a few dollars cheaper than most other stores i've seen.
Winco has them?...huh, never noticed. Thanks.
Check Fred Meyers price as well. That's where I get mine.
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Old 07-10-2012, 03:09 PM   #31
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

You can also order them direct from MH. There are kinds on there that you dont see in most stores. My bro even talked them into mixing up the box,so you dont have to order a whole box of just one kind. I just grab one every time I go to bimart or Walmart,and when season rolls around I have plenty,and dont have to shell out 50-60 bucks all at once.
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Old 07-10-2012, 05:03 PM   #32
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Default Re: Backpacking Tips

Torillas
Home dried and powdered refried beans.
And if you want to pack some of the BabyBel cheese it will last weeks on end in direct sunlight as it is protected with a wax dipping.
These three items are easy to pack, and pack all kinds of protein and carbs. Add some Taco Bell sauce if desired.

I've been drying several cans of NON FAT or Vegetarian refried beans this week prepping for a week long kayak trip on a cheap food dehydrator. The NON FAT has no lard in it so it dries down nicely and won't go rancid on ya! Once it's completely dry, just run it through the blender on liquify mode until it is the consistency of flour. For additional zip, dd any additional spices, or dried items like onion, garlic, jalapeno, or green chili's either before or after you turn the beans to dust.

Two 16oz cans (32oz's) will get down to ~7.5oz of dried beans. Rehydrate by adding approximately 1.5 times as much water as bean powder into a Ziplock bag and mush it around with your fingers until it is the constancy you like.

Lather up a tortilla, and grate some cheese and roll yourself a burrito.
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Last edited by INSAYN; 07-11-2012 at 05:44 PM.
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:33 AM   #33
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When your looking at designing a meal plan, you may want to avoid items like garlic and onions. They can produce quite a distinctive smelling sweat when consumed. This pearl came from an Iroquois elder that I met, when I lived out east.
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:58 AM   #34
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Lots of good info here. One of my favorites are instant mashed potatoes. I use powdered milk, and mix it, the potatoes and salt before I leave. Gather up a few of those packets of butter from KFC and you're set. Then just add water and you've got mashed potatoes. A 1/3 cup of potatoes has 160 calories, 17g carbs and 2g protein. They weight very little and are pretty tasty.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:59 AM   #35
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The tendency on a long trip is to pack too much stuff. Most of the things you think to take because you might need it can be left behind. My new rule is if I am not going to use it pretty much every day it gets left. the exceptions are first aid, small emergency kit & stuff for taking care of a critter. Can easily cut 10 pounds by doing this. Takes some trips though to sort it out.

The other tip is that it can be hard psychologically to sustain the extra hunting effort that makes a difference day after day on a longer trip. After getting worn down over a couple a days, it gets too easy to not go the extra mile or worse to back out of there. Not sure of the remedy, just know the wall is out there and be prepared to hit it at some point.
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Old 07-11-2012, 11:29 AM   #36
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Yes - I would recommend looking at a list that a "Minimalist or ultrlight backpacking list" would take on a trip. But even their key issues are the amount of food and water they need to take. Assuming water is an easyt o finditem - you can end up with a large amount of weight.

I think I figured about 2.5 lbs per day for food. Assuming mostly dry food.
Add on Water - 2 liters

You can see it will add up fast.

Assuming it is not summer - cold enough to need a shelter - that will add weight.

So create an equipment list and add weight next to it - Then you can see what you will carry




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Originally Posted by Beamerfish View Post
The tendency on a long trip is to pack too much stuff. Most of the things you think to take because you might need it can be left behind. My new rule is if I am not going to use it pretty much every day it gets left. the exceptions are first aid, small emergency kit & stuff for taking care of a critter. Can easily cut 10 pounds by doing this. Takes some trips though to sort it out.

The other tip is that it can be hard psychologically to sustain the extra hunting effort that makes a difference day after day on a longer trip. After getting worn down over a couple a days, it gets too easy to not go the extra mile or worse to back out of there. Not sure of the remedy, just know the wall is out there and be prepared to hit it at some point.
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:00 PM   #37
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yeah, this will be my first stay for an extended time. Thankyou everyone for all the great info so far, i have been doign research and have foudn out that i am going to need some serious calories for my body type. Once my metabolism kicks into gear which will be day 2 i will be in need of at least 7000 calories per day. I have a very good metabolism and in the high altitude rugged country of the rubies i will need to maximize calories per ounce so that i can survive for 7 days. I spoke with a my moms dietition and nutritionist and she gave me some ideas on what to do.

Its going to be fun and i am learning alot about what i will need to do to accomplish this trip, on a side note we will be camping at lakes for our main spot and all alternatives. Each lake is supposedly a great fishing lake so we will be packing some small poles for afternoon passtimes and pottential meals.
If you plan on consuming 7,000 calories per day that's going to be a lot of weight in food. When I backpack I put a days worth of food in a gallon ziplock bag. That way if I'm going in 5 days then I can grab 5 bags.

When I backpack I pack about 3,500 calories per day. Some days I don't eat all that. I would suggest you figure out what you are going to eat to get 7,000 calories and weigh it out. You might be suprised how much it weighs.

Last edited by ElkChaser; 07-11-2012 at 07:01 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:06 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by ElkChaser View Post
If you plan on consuming 7,000 calories per day that's going to be a lot of weight in food. When I backpack I put a days worth of food in a gallon ziplock bag. That way if I'm going in 5 days then I can grab 5 bags.

When I backpack I pack about 3,500 calories per day. Some days I don't eat all that. I would suggest you figure out what you are going to eat to get 7,000 calories and weigh it out. You might be suprised how much it weighs.
i acctually just got done test eating a granola recipe we found online although it is a little sweet it is pushing 1000 calories a cup and if i take 3 cups per day to munch on i should be able to use it with mountain house meals to reach a comfortable 5500-7500 calorie day!!!
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:24 PM   #39
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i acctually just got done test eating a granola recipe we found online although it is a little sweet it is pushing 1000 calories a cup and if i take 3 cups per day to munch on i should be able to use it with mountain house meals to reach a comfortable 5500-7500 calorie day!!!
Please share the recipe if you don't mind. Sounds like a good one.
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:29 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beamerfish View Post
The tendency on a long trip is to pack too much stuff. Most of the things you think to take because you might need it can be left behind. My new rule is if I am not going to use it pretty much every day it gets left. the exceptions are first aid, small emergency kit & stuff for taking care of a critter. Can easily cut 10 pounds by doing this. Takes some trips though to sort it out.

The other tip is that it can be hard psychologically to sustain the extra hunting effort that makes a difference day after day on a longer trip. After getting worn down over a couple a days, it gets too easy to not go the extra mile or worse to back out of there. Not sure of the remedy, just know the wall is out there and be prepared to hit it at some point.
Boy isn't that the truth! My first multi day BP hunt I was 80lbs of gear, next 60lbs, hopefully the next will be closer to 40lbs but I doubt it. Very little of my gear is ultra-light weight. You really have spend some serious $$ to drop that extra weight.
Personally I'm in the novice stage of backpacking, so I find this thread very useful.
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:47 AM   #41
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we are still perfecting our version of the recip[e, once she gets it right i will post it. The base recipe is about 500-700 calories per cup so we are adding things like almonds, and mollasses to bring the calories per ounce up.
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Old 07-12-2012, 08:43 AM   #42
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I am curious to find out how you arrived at 7000 calories a day. I understand that you have a fairly high metabolism and that will certainly factor into the calculation. Would you mind sharing your thought process on how you arrived at that figure.

The reason I ask is because that number seems fairly high to me. I typically eat about 3000 calories per day in my everyday life, and I have a rather high metabolism. I understand that backpacking and hunting does take more energy, and thus more calories, than everyday life. However, I would seriously ask myself if I could get by with only 5000 calories per day. It could very well bring your packing weight down. I am not sure how many calories I really need when I do a long (5+) day pack trip while hunting, but I am pretty sure I don't consume 7000 calories in a day.

It is just something to consider.

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Old 07-12-2012, 09:08 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canes_venatici View Post
I am curious to find out how you arrived at 7000 calories a day. I understand that you have a fairly high metabolism and that will certainly factor into the calculation. Would you mind sharing your thought process on how you arrived at that figure.

The reason I ask is because that number seems fairly high to me. I typically eat about 3000 calories per day in my everyday life, and I have a rather high metabolism. I understand that backpacking and hunting does take more energy, and thus more calories, than everyday life. However, I would seriously ask myself if I could get by with only 5000 calories per day. It could very well bring your packing weight down. I am not sure how many calories I really need when I do a long (5+) day pack trip while hunting, but I am pretty sure I don't consume 7000 calories in a day.

It is just something to consider.


right now based on my diet at rest i eat about 5000-6000 calories a day with no strenuous activity. i do not gain weight but mantain my weight at about 192. last year for opening weekend i lost 20 pounds just from the kickup in activity which kickstarted my metabolism into workout mode. so therefore if i add 1000 calories i will still lose wieght but maintain the amoutn off fuel my metabolism needs to function properly. i am somewhat of a freak when it comes to metabolism, most people eat one footlong from subway, i am not full unless i eat 2.



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Old 07-12-2012, 09:09 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canes_venatici View Post
I am curious to find out how you arrived at 7000 calories a day. I understand that you have a fairly high metabolism and that will certainly factor into the calculation. Would you mind sharing your thought process on how you arrived at that figure.

The reason I ask is because that number seems fairly high to me. I typically eat about 3000 calories per day in my everyday life, and I have a rather high metabolism. I understand that backpacking and hunting does take more energy, and thus more calories, than everyday life. However, I would seriously ask myself if I could get by with only 5000 calories per day. It could very well bring your packing weight down. I am not sure how many calories I really need when I do a long (5+) day pack trip while hunting, but I am pretty sure I don't consume 7000 calories in a day.

It is just something to consider.



CV
I am kind of a freak when it come to metabolism. i eat anywhere from 4000-6000 calories a day and maintain my weight at about 192lbs. to explain how much i eat i will tell you that for lucnh if i go to subway i eat 2 footlongs to completley satisfy my hunger. mind you this is just my regular appitie with no strenuous activity, when i start to add exercise and i start to lose weight very fast. last year for the first 3 days of elk season i dropped 20 pounds without even thinking about it. it is not irregular for athletes who have very fast metablosims to eat 12000 calories a day when they are at peak performance. so when i am working out i drop down to about 175lbs and i eat lots and lots of food. its a gift and a curse if you think about it.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:31 AM   #45
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awlays the skinny guys that can eat like hogs and stay skinny haha wish i were that lucky
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