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Old 05-21-2008, 10:39 PM   #1
Hard Cast
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Default Composite vs. laminated stock

I am in the process of research for the purchase of a couple of new rifles. Initially, I was set on a synthetic/composite stock but the more I learn, the more I am persuaded to consider a laminated stock. I have been reading that most rifles equipped with factory synthetic stocks are not as accurate compared to wood, and laminated wood is suppose to be more durable and even more accurate than traditional wood stocks. I don’t really like the looks of the laminated stocks but maybe they will “grow on me.”

So, the first question is; are rifles with laminated stocks noticeably more accurate than composite stocks? If so, is it enough to warrant carrying around the extra weight while hunting? Any other opinions on this issue?

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Old 05-22-2008, 03:25 AM   #2
bigjake_888
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Default Re: Composite vs. laminated stock

It depends on what sythetic stock. Factory sythetics (remington for sure) are lousy stocks to bed. Some gunsmiths will not bed a factory sythetic stock. Higher end sythetic stocks are (I think) stiffer than wood and therefore lead to more accuracy. Check out the H-S precision stocks.
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Old 05-22-2008, 08:42 AM   #3
oregon45
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Default Re: Composite vs. laminated stock

I would go with a quality synthetic stock like a McMillan; laminate stocks have no advantage--besides cost--over a good, fiberglass stock. Laminate stocks, if improperly sealed, can delaminate, and I have seen them split at the wrist in heavy recoiling calibers. They are not more accurate than traditional wood, if the wood is inletted and bedded correctly. For mass production rifles inlet on CNC machines and bedded to "sample" actions (as is done in the factory) laminates make alot of sense because they are cheap and durable; however for a replacement stock I would recommend spending the extra money on a McMillan or HS Precision or a Banser stock. You will be happier in the long run.

All that said, I do like the laminate stock that came with my CZ 527 varmint.
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Old 05-22-2008, 11:07 PM   #4
HuntnCoug
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Default Re: Composite vs. laminated stock

I have a Remington 700 300 ultra mag with a laminate stalk and it is awseome. I have used it really hard for the past three years and it shows less wear then the synthetic stalked guns that I own and looks a heck of a lot better.
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Old 05-23-2008, 09:56 AM   #5
ehunter
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Default Re: Composite vs. laminated stock

Dan correct me if I am wrong but typically laminate stocks tend to be heavier as well.



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Originally Posted by HuntnCoug View Post
I have a Remington 700 300 ultra mag with a laminate stalk and it is awseome. I have used it really hard for the past three years and it shows less wear then the synthetic stalked guns that I own and looks a heck of a lot better.
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Old 05-23-2008, 02:06 PM   #6
Dan360
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Default Re: Composite vs. laminated stock

On average, laminated stocks do run a bit heavier. A good company like Boyds Gunstocks will remove excess weight from the fore-end and butt in non-essential areas to make the stock weigh less.

In my opinion, laminates and laid-up fiberglass stocks are the most stable stocks that you can buy. When properly sealed, a laminated stock is just as tough as anything. Plus, you get the feel of wood on your rifle instead of plastic. Laid-up fiberglass stocks are lighter (not a whole lot lighter once you add aluminum bedding chassis) and just as strong. They are the most weather resistant and they can be had in many finishes and paint jobs.

In the end, ask yourself what feels and looks better in your hands. If you like the warm looks and feel of wood, go laminate. You won't be disappointed. If you want something that is darn-near fool proof and will be resistant to any weather, go fiberglass. I have used Boyds JRS Classic laminates and HS Precision Kevlar/Fiberglass stocks (these can be had with a 3/4 chassis to reduce weight). The HS Precision runs about $360 after shipping. The Boyds runs around $190.

If you are interested in HS Precision and have a long-action Remington 700, shoot me a line. I have a brand new one that I can let go for less than what you would pay if you bought from HS Precision.
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